Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday

Friday, January 23, 2015

Horsepower or Powered by Horse.......


Tractors were few in the early 1800's in central United States.  Horses were the beasts to pull most all of the farm machinery. As this country was settled most farmers had only one horse. They would have to prepare the soil by plowing and raking but then would sow their seed by hand. Later horses of all sizes would become working teams and the larger the horse the better to use in the field. The photo is shown in the Granger, Iowa Centennial Book.  The town of Granger is just south of where I live so these are scenes of everyday farming in my county, Dallas County, Iowa.


You had to feed your powered buggy as the automobile was not readily available to purchase.  The doctor would make his calls by horse and buggy no matter what the weather would be.  As you can see this buggy did have a overhead to pull up to protect the driver from the falling elements.


One would have to wear warm clothes as they traveled in the winter.  I believe this was a doctor making a house call in the Granger area.





















Having a horse drawn carriage, or wagon, meant tying it up to the rail next to the business you are visiting.  As you can see the streets are dirt streets and the telephone and/or electricity is in the town. The source book in which I found these photos was created in 1984 and they were celebrating their 100 years in existence as a town.  Some of these structures are still standing today as you look down the street. No many of them but some.


Horsepower was essential to bring in the harvest.  I do see there is some sort of a lift, gasoline powered, that will elevate the bundles of hay to the haymow. You can see the man standing at the top of the lift waiting for bundles to be sent to him in which he would take a pitchfork and heave it into the mow.






In southern Iowa where I grew up and went to school there was a man who used his horses to plow gardens.  This photo is in Murray, Iowa and George Both is driving his team through town to go plow another garden.  The date of this photo has to be 1956 or a little later judging by the look of the cars in the photo.  I remember seeing him drive through town and thought nothing of it.

I would help take care of my father in laws horse not 8 years ago. I am not a great horsemen but I did have to feed and water the horse on the farm twice a day.  It was important to check on them so they don't get out and wander onto the highway.  My wife's father had three horses and four mules for a while in my early years in the family.  The mules kept escaping and he had to eventually sell them or learn to shut his gates better.

Sepia Saturday is a great place to visit many people on both sides of the globe who are sharing photos and thoughts about the pictures.  Visit the others in this group by clicking here on  SEPIA SATURDAY to be taken to the listings of all the others.

11 comments:

Deb Gould said...

Love your old photos, Larry -- and the one with the horse coming down the main street, surrounded by all those 1950s cars? That's wonderful!

La Nightingail said...

That one photo with both automobiles and horse & buggy is great!

boundforoz said...

A good reminder of the value of the horse. An interesting post.

Liz Needle said...

Great old photos. In the forties in Adelaide and suburbs we had our milk, ice and bread delivered by horse and cart. The scrap merchant and the Bottlo also came by with horse and carts.

Sharon said...

A great selection of photos. I feel for the doctors who lived in cold places with snow (and the patients).

Postcardy said...

Great photos and history. I especially like the 1950s one with the various modes of transportation.

Little Nell said...

Perfect Sepia Saturday posting! Wonderful images reminding us of the importance of horses (and doctors).

Nancy said...

I suppose it might have been easier - or at least more successful - to get around in the snow with a horse pulling a carriage or sleigh than to rely on an automobile on rural, unplowed roads. I think I remember reading that in the early days of cars if/when they became stuck in the mud, teams of horses would be found to pull them out. But then, it would have colder riding in a carriage pulled by a horse than in a car with a heater....

Barbara Fisher said...

I’m a farmer’s daughter, but my memories don’t go back far enough to remember horse ploughs. I know dad used them because there are photos, but I only remember tractors. We had two horses on the farm, but they were just for riding and hunting (not that I ever did – I preferred to stand on the other side of the fence!) my sister was the horsewoman. I preferred the cows and chickens. I enjoyed your post and the memories it brought back.

Tattered and Lost said...

Years ago in London I was stunned one morning when I looked out my window in the Kensington area and saw an old man drive by in a wagon pulled by two horses. I felt as if I'd gone to sleep in the last part of the 20th century and awakened in the last part of the 19th.

carolann said...

Your photos are awesome and your history.

Very interesting.

Glad you share.