Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday

Saturday, August 21, 2010

Twenties Youth.......

Finding new photos of my parents  while in their twenties has been an interesting journey.  A black photo album with their early dating pictures glued in and and first year of marriage was found in a box upstairs.  I had brought it home earlier, maybe a year ago, and I had not checked it out for it's contenets until now.

I cropped out this photo of them at a park with a Burgus family reunion.  I am guessing that this is either 1940 the summer before they married in December or the very next year.  They could have been married in this photo and baby number one was on it's way in October.








Jesse T. Burgus  1917 -2000,   Zella M. Burgus 1919-2008




My older brother and I have had conversations with Aunts that told us that the War changed our father a lot in temperament.  They use to tell us he was such a happy young guy who really enjoyed life.  From this new group of photos I found this one of my dad.  He had to be 22 years old or a little more.  He reminds me of the high school kids I use to teach in school with that carefree happy smile. Dad is also dressed up for being in the park.  He either is courting my mom, which explains the good clothes  or he has just married her 6 months before which also explains the good clothes.  My mom was into clothes and being a little showy with them.  So her husband should be fancy looking also.

My dad had a lot of happy times and I don't think his change from being in the War ruined him.  I know he loved to laugh at a good joke, or smile when he caught a good fish.  He was so glad to see his  grandchildren and loved to travel.  The things that the War experience gave him was a continuous haunt of what  happened in battle.  He was one that talked about it a lot to any listening ear. He was still talking those last days when I took him to the emergency room the last time.  He was out of his head and his body was shutting down, mainly his  heart.  He was reliving the cutting off of a fellows leg out in the field with another soldier operating and his emotions were so real as if he was still over there at the very location.

Life is hard for all of us and we all have things that make us sad or distressed.  I don't think my father was any different than anyone else. The coping part is done so differently by each person in their own way.  Tragedy is a part of life and we lie to ourselves to think that any kind of life experiences can not be called tragic if they affect us emotionally in a severe way.  Scars are scars no matter how we receive them.

I am glad to find this new set of photos and to be able to view my parents in young love and their early lives before the war.

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Dad did have

13 comments:

Vicki Lane said...

So young and happy -- good to see this side of our parents.

gibknitty said...

wow, your post is so interesting. your dad sounds like he carried a lot around with him. it is so nice that you have these photos of him young and in love with your mom.

Marilyn said...

I love the photo of your parents, they look so happy together and your Dad looks as though he is enjoying having his photo taken in the second one too. The war did so much harm to so many, many of the scars couldn't be seen but were carried within.

Alan Burnett said...

It is indeed sad how times change us. From the perspective of one who has never fought in a war - thank goodness - I cannot imagine how someone could have gone through such an experience and come out the other end the same. A moving and thoughtful post Larry.

John Hayes said...

So true about how people cope differently. My father also was haunted by his war time experiences--even tho he was a non-com, being in the Seabees, his troop was subject to bombing raids, & they also saw a lot of death when they came in to build on islands (he was in the pacific) after battles. He took the exact opposite tack from your dad in that he never talked about it--I think he would have been better off if he had.

Christine H. said...

Larry, your beautiful writing created a more vivid picture than the pictures themselves.

Pat transplanted to MN said...

Poignant post, again, Larry. Just this week at book club we discussed effects of war on individuals, particularly men who served in WWII. Everyone is different and I believe some people are stronger of soul and mind than others and cope better. An experience that would strangle one person just makes another person strive harder to overcome and not look back. You present interesting thoughts. And it must be delightful to look through the forgotten photos, adding to your collections...

Martin H. said...

Nice shot of your parents. Your dad was a handsome chap, and a snappy dresser. So sad that he, like many other who have experienced the horrors of war, remained haunted for the rest of his days. My step-father was just like that. Like your father, he was in the 'front-line' until the end.

A fine post, Larry. Thank you.

Barbara and Nancy said...

I'll bet it helped that your dad was able to talk about his war experiences. So many keep it bottled up and maybe suffer even more.
Your dad was very handsome and I love his shoes!

I thought I had left a comment on Saturday but I must have forgotten to click the "post comment" button.

Far Side of Fifty said...

Some women made their husbands dress better than others. I also noticed your Dads snazzy shoes! Many of the Soldiers from all the wars relive their time in Battle..it is sad, he was lucky to be able to talk about it. And lucky to have you with him to listen. :)

Doowmée said...

Thank you for your visit on my blog, Larry, but "Nuit, porteuse de larmes" is not a photograph but a painting in acrylic. I made an evening of blues, but the picture on the blog does not do justice to such tears flowing beads on the cheek of my weeping! This test has disappeared during an exhibition.
I go regularly to your blog, I loveit, but I do not leave comments every time, it is much more compelling to write in English ! I can easily read English, write a bit more complicated ! When I confess to google translations sometimes confusing, so I take my time.
I love your photos sepia or black and white of old, loaded with stories of memories and emotions ...

Good day on Friday, enjoy the fine weather, because we already feel that summer, quietly, bowing out!

Doowmée

Doowmée said...

Just an addendum to my previous post
But this is like your father in the Pacific off the coast of France, or now in Iraq, Afghanistan, what a terrible thing war flying their families brave son, or give their wounded.
In France we do not forget all those brave American soldiers who gave their lives for our freedom, even though I was born years later, there is always a place for the USA in my heart.

Vicki Lane said...

Love that happy first picture! Your mom looks so jaunty!